The Daddy Complex

improvisingfatherhood:

I’m excited to announce a fun show I am hosting on E-MPROV.com this Sunday at 9pm PST. Charlie Capen and Andy Herald (www.howtobeadad.com), and David Vienna ( thedaddycomplex ) will be joining me for a live Google Hangout improv show. 

Send us questions either here on Tumblr, or to our Twitter accounts (listed below) using the hashtag #EMPROV . We will answer your questions and then use those discussions to inspire some improv comedy. 

Then on Sunday night at 9pm PST, tune into www.E-MPROV.com to watch the live show. 

Send questions to:

@howtobeadad ,@thedaddycomplex, and @improvfather with hashtag #EMPROV

This. Is. Happening.

According to a sleep deprivation study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, after two weeks of getting only 6 hours of sleep per night (or less), you experience the cognitive equivalent of being legally drunk.

So, parents are basically drunkards.

everyoneisgay:

!!! For Every Book Pre-Ordered, We Will Donate A Copy To A PFLAG Chapter !!!

SOMETHING AWESOME IS HAPPENING.

We recently talked to the lovely human beings at Chronicle Books (our book’s publisher), and explained how important we felt it was to get This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids in the hands of people who need it most: parents of LGBTQ kids (duh).

Chronicle agreed with us, and so through September 8th, every single pre-order for This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids will be matched with a book donated to a local PFLAG Chapter!!!!

All you need to do is this:

1. Pre-order your copy
2. Go to this link to make sure your pre-order is matched!!

TADA! If you’ve already pre-ordered, you can still let Chronicle know and ensure that you are getting a copy donated.

This is pretty amazing.
Please share far & wide!!

xoxoxo

Dannielle & Kristin

(via books)

Pushing The Envelope

Me:
Let's try something new today. If you ask for something and someone—me, your mom, your teacher—says no, ask why first. Get more information. Because there's always a reason and it might keep you from flipping out.

Wyatt:
Okay, let's try it now. Papa, can I have ice cream for breakfast?

My 21 month old will not stop biting, hitting or throwing things. We've tried talking to him, sitting him in time out, distraction, yelling and most recently banishment (sat in a closed off area of the house to calm down) but he's right back to the act as soon as he's out of punishment! Any advice?

Asked by Anonymous

As always, my first piece of advice is generally: Don’t take my advice.

But, if you were to ignore that, I’d say the key is consistency.

Pick one of the many things you’ve listed up there and stick with it. If, say, you put him in a time out (though 21 months might be a tad young for that to have any effect, just FYI) and he resumes the behavior as soon as he’s free, put him right back in.

All that said, experts say positive reinforcement tends to work better with kids in your son’s age range. So, rather than punish him for biting, reward him for the other things he does. And that reward can be as simple as a laugh or a “Yay!” Not something grandiose, however, like a vacation home in Fiji.

Those same experts also say a rigid daily schedule could help ease his frustration, etc.—things that tend to manifest as biting. So, if he’s not on a regular nap and meal schedule, get him on one.

If all that fails, that Hannibal Lecter mask might be a good Plan C.

Episode 13.5 - David Vienna

I don’t always blather, but when I do, I make sure it’s recorded.

[This is the same interview I did with Chris Read (aka Canadian Dad) a little while ago. It was just reposted on the Life of Dad site, so I thought I’d link it ICYMI.]

Conversation Held Over The Boys' Walkie-Talkies (Me Downstairs, Them Upstairs)

Me:
I replaced the batteries in this one, Wyatt.

Wyatt:
Okay, Papa. I love you.

Me:
Aww. I love you, too, buddy.

Boone:
Can I have my walkie-talkie back now?

High-res In light of the awful things going on in Ferguson, people often whittle the problem down to the idea that things would be better off of we treated people the way we want to be treated. That whole “do unto others” thing.
But, that’s not right. Because you can punch me, kick me, hold me down, and I’ll get right back up. I’ve been around, I know how things work and I can take it.
I’d rather we treated each other the way we want our kids to be treated. Kids should be looking at the world with wonder and joy, playing pirates and eating ice cream on a hot day. Not dodging tear gas, not dodging wooden bullets.
Ferguson, we all see what’s happening. Even if you win the battle, you’ve already lost the war. So, think of those young people protesting in the streets as your children, your flesh and blood, the baby your cradled in your arms on sleepless nights.
Now that you’ve got that in your mind, how would you feel if someone pointed a weapon at your kid?
(photo via passingpotato)

In light of the awful things going on in Ferguson, people often whittle the problem down to the idea that things would be better off of we treated people the way we want to be treated. That whole “do unto others” thing.

But, that’s not right. Because you can punch me, kick me, hold me down, and I’ll get right back up. I’ve been around, I know how things work and I can take it.

I’d rather we treated each other the way we want our kids to be treated. Kids should be looking at the world with wonder and joy, playing pirates and eating ice cream on a hot day. Not dodging tear gas, not dodging wooden bullets.

Ferguson, we all see what’s happening. Even if you win the battle, you’ve already lost the war. So, think of those young people protesting in the streets as your children, your flesh and blood, the baby your cradled in your arms on sleepless nights.

Now that you’ve got that in your mind, how would you feel if someone pointed a weapon at your kid?

(photo via passingpotato)